Resting the Cocoa Liquor

cocoa liquor

I have been noticing. Cocoa, immediately after grinding and several weeks after, taste very different. The difference is not from good to bad but the other way around. The aroma becomes more fragrant and attractive and the actual taste becomes more awesome.

cocoa liquor

It is not only me who is noticing the changes. My brother, every time he wants to prepare a hot chocolate drink, he will always go for the old stock. Preferably several months old from the date of production. Less than a week is a no and a newly ground is a sin.

My colleague who is also into chocolate making has a method of his own but follows the same idea. He is storing the packaged chocolate inside a big earthen jar for some time before sale. He never revealed how long as it is his trade secret.

I assumes. Chocolate can also be subjected to process called aging. Why? Wine and related products are aged. Wine and chocolate are similar in what sense? Only for those who never know, cocoa bean processing starts right after breaking the mature pods. The fresh wet beans are kept in partially airtight container for fermentation. So that is the similarity. However, I have no scientific evidence to prove my point.

Until, during one of my reading sessions I accidentally stumbled to video recording of Mast Brother Chocolate Makers. They are doing a trick called resting the cocoa liquor after grinding. They simply put the ground cocoa in stainless bin, cover it with plastic film and let untouched for several weeks to months. They also show a bin they have been resting for about a year. I am curious how delicious it is now and how expensive it becomes.


Ads

Be the first to leave a comment. Don’t be shy.

Join the Discussion