The Roasted Sampalok Seeds

I bought a pack of sampalok candy for my toddler. He was the one who chose it, not me. I thought the candy had no seeds cause it passed by the hands of food processors. My wife grabbed the package. She was pressing every candy before gaving it to my son. She said most of the candies still had seeds.

After a while, my son got full. I got the package and eat all the contents. Most of the sampalok candies really still had seeds. I was spitting away every seed that came in touch. It was almost too late when I remembered my unfinished experiment about the sampalok seeds.

Good thing, I managed to set aside three seeds. Only three but it would be enough to continue my experiment.

In my last experiment, “Are Tamarind Seeds Edible?” I boiled the seeds for one hour. No changes happen so I threw it all.

Simon commented that sampalok seeds are really edible. He states a way to cook it properly. Hey, if you dry roast the tamarind seed in a pan over a medium heat, keeping them moving to stop them burning, for around 10 minutes they will be truly edible. The outer coating will split on the seed, then crack away easily when you come to peel the seed. They taste slightly like coffee and peanuts, they are hard to the tooth, but edible nonetheless. You can boil them after you have dry roasted them to make them softer, but the crunch is satisfying.

I roasted the seeds on a frying pan for 15 minutes. I was not satisfied with “ten” so I made it 15. I let the seeds cool. I tested if I can remove the seed coat. Yes! The seed coat cracked easily using finger nail.

roasted tamarind seeds

How about the seed cotyledon? As said by Simon, the taste is slightly similar roasted coffee beans. It is hard but crunchy. I felt firecrackers exploding loudly inside my mouth.

Warning! Eating the roasted sampalok seeds is enjoyable but not recommended for individual with weak teeth.

roasted sampalok seeds peels


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