The Homemade Durian Candies and Pastillas

I wanted to break the durian open but I never know how. I mean I never knew the proper way. I might damage the seed and pulp upon opening. I have been hearing the proper way of opening the fruit from my colleagues but never had a chance to see it actual. My only choice was a guessing game.

While assessing  the fruit from a distance, I noticed five vague lines drawn from the stalk down to fruit tip. The numerous spines covering the fruit made the line  almost unnoticeable. The lines were equally spaced that it divided the fruit into five parts.  Maybe I should cut the fruit along the lines, and that was what I did.  I carefully cut two adjacent lines with a saw knife. I made the cut not too deep to prevent any possible pulp and seed damage.

durian durian showing fruit divisionsVoila! I was not sure if I did it right but no seeds and pulp were harmed. Forgot to take a shot of intact flesh though. I continued opening the fruit by cutting the other vague lines.

opened durian fruit large and small durian seedsHmm! Yummy!

The  delectable pulp was notoriously sticking to my fingers. It might be a good material for holding sugar and milk powder together. Besides, no one wanted to eat it but me so I decided to take it to the next level, making a durian candy or pastillas.

I discarded all the seeds and added enough sugar to taste. Taking off the seeds was a real mess. Mixed the two materials thoroughly until well blended.  Added and mixed powdered milk continually until it became tacky and could be form into  candies or pastillas. Sprinkled corn starch to my hand and began forming the final products. Cornstarch was necessary to prevent the mixture from sticking to hand.

durian pulp and sugar durian pulp  sugar and milk dough homemade durian pastillas and candy

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Accepts coaching and consultancy services. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines.

Why Durian Smells Bad?

For more than 24 hours, the ripe durian has been sitting on white chair. The smell comes and go but I never find it disgusting. I think it is attractive. A minimal part of aroma has similarity to ripe jackfruit (concentrate and try to separate the undesirable smell away). It seems telling me to break it open and eat the delectable flesh.

ripe durian on chairMaybe the smell is a real turn off for others and I used to think it the same way. However, it is not anything near to rotten onion, spoiled meat and poo. The taste is a complete opposite of what most people think. Its taste is superb.

There are two popular paragraphs on the web that are trying to explain why durian smell so bad. Study results both came from the same group of scientists.

Li and colleagues identified 46 different aroma molecules, including fruity, skunky, honey, caramel, and roasted onion smells. Eight of the 13 most common molecules, identified at the lowest dilutions, were unknown in durian until now. The researchers write that they’d have to recreate the durian aroma without particular ingredients to determine the relative contributions of each aroma molecule without a doubt. via

In breaking down aroma extract, taken from Thai durians, with a mass spectrometer and gas chromatograph, the team, led by Jia-Ziao Li, pinpointed 50 discrete compounds in the fruit responsible for its uncommon aroma. Those compounds included eight that hadn’t been detected in durians before—and four compounds that had been completely unknown to science. via

If you find durian smell disagreeable, then I won’t argue. I recommend wearing a gas mask before taking the fruit. Enjoy it!

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Accepts coaching and consultancy services. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines.

Any Food Use of Durian Rind?

I know. The thick Durian peels can be processed to paper. There are several tutorials about durian peel paper making on the net. I also read about the guy who won award by presenting this kind.

I am curious. Are there any edible products out of durian peels? Maybe it can be: 1) drench with sugar – as sweet delicacy, 2) slice and fry to crispiness – as cracklings, 3) a wine – add some sugar and ferment, 4) a medicinal drug to cure simple to chronic diseases, and…?

Maybe a development of breed with reasonably thin peel is more justifiable. A breed with less pointed thorns too.  Consumers want the flesh, not the rind.

durian rind peel thorny

 

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Accepts coaching and consultancy services. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines.