The Coconut Husk Broiled Cassava

I posted the article about, “Using Coconut Husk to Roast Taro Corms” before this one.

The idea behind roasting gabi/taro inside burning coconut husk came from cassava. When the three of us, three brothers, were still young kids and used to help our pops in his farming activities, roasted kamoteng kahoy was our unusual merienda. The usual were boiled gabi, cassava, ube and Saba banana.

We were gathering coconut husks, the remains after harvesting, and pulling off some kamoteng kahoy. Brushed the cassava with husk to remove adhering soils. Assembled the half part of coconuts husk. Placed facing up on ground. Fired it. Put enough cassava. Covered it with the other half of husk. Then waited until all the husk turned to ashes.

This side activity was being done during break time or before work commenced. It’s good to have a ready snack right after work.

It was a good finger food. Holding the toasted cassava with bare hands. Pulling off the brittle hard skin. Then eating the juicy to powdery flesh. The cassava with no excess water  and with a strong smoke taste and aroma.

The following pictures are remake.

cassava on coconut huskcassava on coconut huskbroiled and toasted cassava

The Pan Fried Cassava Cake

It was my mom’s favorite recipe when we were still kids. It is the budget and quick version of regular cassava cake, the pan fried cassava cake.¬† It is a great alternative if llaneras and steamer are not available, the cook is short on budget and the people around are bored of nilagang kamoteng kahoy.

pan fried cassava cakeThe ingredients are grated cassava, a little sugar and oil. Wash cassava. Remove the peels, see “How to Make Cassava Chips” for peeling instructions. Grate. Mix sugar. Get a half cup then fry on little oil. Turn both sides until both surfaces are crispy golden brown. Repeat until all mixture is consumed. A non-stick Teflon pan is recommended to prevent sticking.

It may result to different texture and appearances.

1) Crispy golden brown outside but oily soft inside. The case if too much oil was added to pan and the lump of cassava mixture was placed when the oil temperature was not hot enough or the fire was too low to compensate the sudden temperature drop.

2) Burnt. The fire was too high or the attendant leaved it in pan for too long. Perhaps watching his favorite television drama or anime. Please pay attention next time!

3) Raw center. A result of too thick cake. Cooking it longer might result to burnt surface. Thicker lumps should be cooked slowly over low fire but might result to next…

4) Tough. Cooking over a very low fire for prolonged time. It allows excessive moisture evaporation resulting to toughness.

5) Any crazy combinations of above items.

I have never tried cooking one yet so no exact parameters were provided.