Saving The Defective Coffee Beans

Defective coffee saving strategies for desperates. Ohh, sorry! I mean the following suggestions are for people who want to get most out of their hard earned money.

Defects:

Dried cherries. Either whole cherries or partially cracked. The milling machine failed separating the bean from husk. Or, accidentally included in batch of good milled beans. Save these for the next mill run.

Beans in parchment. Husk removal by machine was successful but parchment was not. Remove the parchment hand then bring back the good bean. This might be harder than what your are thinking.

Fragments. Broken beans, fragments an pulper nipped are three separate categories in terms of coffee defects. Broken means a small part is removed, fragments are smaller than broken, pulper nipped are either broken or fragment but caused by pulping machine (coffee wet processing). These three are all fragments to me. I suggest separating these types. Then make the size more or less uniform by passing it thru grinder or hammer mill. Roast separately using adjusted parameters.

Shells. They look literally like clam shells. Thinner than regular beans. Treat it like fragment beans.

Insect holed beans. Save and do as instructed in fragments section. Reduce its size separately and winnow two to three times to expel weevil and weevil discharge.

Do the above items at your own risks! Good result is not guaranteed.

All the non-mentioned defects should be discarded.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Accepts coaching and consultancy services. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines.

The Paper Beneath Every Siopao

I love siopao. I love it that I often forgot to remove the thin piece of paper beneath. The paper is thin, tasteless and looks like a part of the bread. The color is semi transparent white. It really mimics the siopao color and texture.

siopao parchment paper

How many of you have eaten the piece of paper? Frankly, I thought the paper was really edible. Way back, during my elementary years, a classmate gave me a soft candy. I removed the outer plastic wrapper. Another piece of packaging was covering the candy. I was about to peel it off when he said, “no need to remove, that paper is edible”. I did what he said and ate the candy with the paper intact.

Actually, the paper is a parchment paper or bakery paper. It is cellulose type – edible but not digestible. It is made by passing paper pulp in bath of sulfuric acid or zinc chloride. It is used to prevent sticking of siopao to steamer surface. It should be removed before eating.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Accepts coaching and consultancy services. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines.